Recovery Coaching

Outside Connecticut

About Jeff

Jeff Chervenak, MS, LADC, is a licensed therapist with a Clinical Psychology Master’s degree in Addiction Studies, where he developed evidence-based skills geared explicitly toward this. As an addiction volunteer with the Connecticut Department of Corrections for over 13 years, Jeff developed a unique approach to helping those who are struggling. Jeff graduated from mindfulness-based Gestalt psychotherapy at Hartford Family Institute.

Jeff focuses his practice on two types of individuals: those (particularly executives) with significant lengths of sobriety, and those who are newly sober or attempting to get sober. Each requires a different approach.

People in early recovery have needs for more of a coaching approach. Jeff Chervenak, MS, LADC, has a Clinical Psychology Master’s degree in Addiction Studies where he developed evidence-based skills geared explicitly for this. As an addiction volunteer with the Connecticut Department of Corrections for over 13 years, Jeff developed a unique approach to helping those who are struggling. Since 2013, Jeff has studied mindfulness-based Gestalt psychotherapy at Hartford Family Institute.


Addiction and Early-Recovery

If you are trying to get sober and still struggling with abstinence, you need to bring all the resources you can to that fight, including therapy, sponsorship, meetings, and other treatment. As a part of that multi-faceted approach, Jeff’s role is to provide that necessary coaching and therapy as you navigate this new landscape: setting goals and achieving results that are self-reinforcing.

Executives and business owners are accustomed to dealing with problems by thinking and planning alone. No strategy could be more destined to fail when tackling addiction. Addiction needs to be dealt with on an emotional level. You cannot think your way through a feeling problem. You don’t think you want to use or drink; you feel like you want to use or drink. This is why figuring out a path to sobriety rarely works for long.

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Getting and staying sober is not easy. It is HARD to do. It may seem obvious, but not deliberately accepting this truth can set you up for failure. You need to bring all the resources you can to the effort. Many alcoholics are lone wolves, especially high achieving individuals, who often resist connection and help. This is the second attitude we need to address. Getting sober is not a goal to be done alone. To maximize success, you want an experienced and trained guide.

Getting and staying sober is so much more than putting down the substance. The substance was the answer to problems that existed before you ever used until it became a separate  problem. We need to treat the whole person, not just the addict or alcoholic part. Most coaches got their training in the rooms of AA and at weekend workshops. I have been in training for over seven years and have a clinical psychology master’s degree in addiction studies. As a result, I can go deeper and provide the support necessary to address the challenges that led to your addiction or alcoholism. I have also been active in recovery personally since 1988. I come to this work after more than thirty years of owning and running a successful mortgage company. My personal experiences and training enable me to understand my clients’ needs and challenges better than most.


Long-Term Recovery

Growth always includes change, but change does not always include growth. We want to grow.

You don’t think you want to use or drink; you feel like you want to use or drink.

Long-time sober men have developed rock-solid tools for not only staying sober but for being responsible, successful men. But we are human, and while the tools we acquired for staying sober have proved to be successful, they don’t always support the deep healing required to attain the kind of happiness that many of us search for.

Are you experiencing: anxiety, malaise, feeling stuck, indecision, less connected,  angry, or a sense something is missing? Are your intimate relationships satisfying? Is doubling down on “getting back to basics” or working this or that Step working? These strategies may seem right and offer some relief, but you still feel like there should be more.  You are right; there is more, and the path to finding that “more” leads to an examination of what led you to alcoholism and/or addiction in the first place.

These challenges you face are a sign that there is more profound work to do; that your present support systems and tools are not enough. You can’t outgrow the Steps, but you can apply their lessons differently. For example: bringing powerlessness, acceptance, turning it over, meditation and prayer in a deliberate fashion to the processes and methods we will use can be transformational. Bill Wilson wrote a letter to a friend about emotional sobriety, appearing in an article of the same name in the Grapevine in 1953.

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Photo of a man looking depressed. Text "Until you address the cause of your pain, you cannot heal from it. I can help. Contact me. Jeff Chervenak, Executive Recovery Coach"